Product 45

Product 45

From the publisher...

Australian Punk / Post-Punk Record Covers

A hardback, case bound visual art book showing the art of alt/indie music in Australia 1976-1980 in 7" record sleeves, this reference book gives a critical review of the packaging of Australian Music. The book contains the great indie/alternative 7" vinyl covers that were either financed by the bands themselves or by the ground breaking, risk taking record businesses of the time. These records have the story behind them, how the artwork came to be, as told by the artist/musician. During this period Australia was the third largest supplier of English speaking musical repertoire to the World. Australian music was unique in the world and at its most popular on the world stage. This book shows how that music was packaged and gives the story behind the artwork from the musician and artists that created it.

PRODUCT 45 focuses on the period 1976-1980. How the music was packaged as told by the artist/musician, the story behind the artwork. 1976 was a major turning point in our music history. It is a logical time to start this book, looking at the creative way music was packaged. The graphic design, the printing processes and delivery of product into the market place. Up until this time the music market was the exclusive domain of major music companies but 1976 was the year of change, where musicians started to do it themselves, to record, package and deliver their music directly to their fans. It was small scattered groups of like-minded individuals who had the DIY mentality. And they were in every Australian capital city and scattered through the countryside. These creative minds just wanted to get their music recorded and heard, hand delivering it to their fan base. The punters that went to their gigs or replied to the ads in the fledgling music press. This music was packaged in hand made, low budget paper sleeves that were spectacular. Without the constraints of the record company art departments, these releases were genuinely creative. While produced on a shoe string budget but with many hands, it was creativity to the maximum. Nothing was off limits, the language used, the photos taken and the variety of print process used, whether hand drawn and hand coloured, one colour photocopy or screen printed onto a variety of textured papers and boards. Some covers were glued, some just folded. People made use of what they could get their hands on to. The creativity in the packaging of music was as great as the music within.